Increasingly Motivated

justbeingseriouslysocial:

This graduate student tweeted Aetna to clear $118,000 of medical bills — and it worked »

When Arijit Guha blasted Aetna on Twitter, it sparked a health care debate that got the insurer to cover all of his medical bills. […] The real social media coup came when Guha turned to Twitter. Using the handle @Poop_Strong on July 26, he fumed, “@Aetna has now denied $118k in claims (in just 5 mos) since kicking me to the curb. Gotta preserve that $2 billion annual profit somehow.” […] Surprisingly, @AetnaHealth replied: “@Poop_Strong We care about our members. We want you to be empowered to be healthy and make informed decisions.”

The phenomenon of people complaining publicly on Twitter and Facebook before even reaching out to customer service is becoming so wide that companies (from all most all trades and nature of business) have Twitter accounts specifically to deal with customer feedback, separate from their general public-facing accounts.
Fact is, complaining about some products and services using Twitter handles and hashtags is easier. And, frankly, anyone who’s ever dealt with customer service for a large company probably thinks they’ll get a response faster that way than if they went through regular channels. So, why wait on hold?

justbeingseriouslysocial:

This graduate student tweeted Aetna to clear $118,000 of medical bills — and it worked »

When Arijit Guha blasted Aetna on Twitter, it sparked a health care debate that got the insurer to cover all of his medical bills. […] The real social media coup came when Guha turned to Twitter. Using the handle @Poop_Strong on July 26, he fumed, “@Aetna has now denied $118k in claims (in just 5 mos) since kicking me to the curb. Gotta preserve that $2 billion annual profit somehow.” […] Surprisingly, @AetnaHealth replied: “@Poop_Strong We care about our members. We want you to be empowered to be healthy and make informed decisions.”

The phenomenon of people complaining publicly on Twitter and Facebook before even reaching out to customer service is becoming so wide that companies (from all most all trades and nature of business) have Twitter accounts specifically to deal with customer feedback, separate from their general public-facing accounts.

Fact is, complaining about some products and services using Twitter handles and hashtags is easier. And, frankly, anyone who’s ever dealt with customer service for a large company probably thinks they’ll get a response faster that way than if they went through regular channels. So, why wait on hold?


Good grammar makes good business sense — and not just when it comes to hiring writers. Writing isn’t in the official job description of most people in our office. Still, we give our grammar test to everybody, including our salespeople, our operations staff, and our programmers. On the face of it, my zero tolerance approach to grammar errors might seem a little unfair. After all, grammar has nothing to do with job performance, or creativity, or intelligence, right? Wrong. If it takes someone more than 20 years to notice how to properly use “it’s,” then that’s not a learning curve I’m comfortable with. So, even in this hyper-competitive market, I will pass on a great programmer who cannot write.

Kyle WiensI Won’t Hire People Who Use Poor Grammar. Here’s Why (via justbeingseriouslysocial)


While social media has significantly shaped how we communicate and connect in our personal lives, there’s a related trend that the most sophisticated enterprises have already begun to embrace: social business. Engaging in social media through Facebook, YouTube and the like represent just one element businesses can explore, but business is more than media – so how can businesses apply the principles of “social” to other dimensions of their organizations to improve outcomes? In today’s business environment, organizations must become more agile, creative and innovative in order to compete. Forward-looking organizations amplify the benefit of human interactions in just about any business process by making them social (as opposed to trying to engineer the human interactions out of the business process, which is the unfortunate legacy of many enterprise systems.)

— Ethan Mcarty in Social Media Week Shines a Light on Social Business (via ibmsocialbiz)


ibmsocialbiz:

A social business is about a million miles from “business as usual,” which is why so many organizations find it difficult — and painful — to fully embrace. It involves a new focus internally and externally. It means the company has to honestly:
Be transparent
Engaged with customers in an ongoing relationship
Distribute, share power
Distribute problem solving
Have people willing to be leadership coaches, not controls
Empower employees to contribute
Develop an interdependent ecosystem of partners
Deliver service when, where, how the customer wants
Enable customers to define products/services
Anticipate customer needs
via Content Insider 233 Social Media Mix
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ibmsocialbiz:

A social business is about a million miles from “business as usual,” which is why so many organizations find it difficult — and painful — to fully embrace. It involves a new focus internally and externally. It means the company has to honestly:

  • Be transparent
  • Engaged with customers in an ongoing relationship
  • Distribute, share power
  • Distribute problem solving
  • Have people willing to be leadership coaches, not controls
  • Empower employees to contribute
  • Develop an interdependent ecosystem of partners
  • Deliver service when, where, how the customer wants
  • Enable customers to define products/services
  • Anticipate customer needs

via Content Insider 233 Social Media Mix